Controlled Substance Agreement North Carolina

According to the Strengthen Opoid Misuse Prevention (STOP) Act of 2017 (NCSL 2017-74), North Carolina healthcare providers who prescribe controlled substances must have access to a CSRS report to verify a patient`s prescribing history with controlled substances before writing prescriptions for targeted controlled substances. No no. Only licensees who prescribed controlled substances (including non-opioids) during their last training cycle are subject to the requirement. Who is subject to the continuing education requirement for controlled substances? Session Law 2107-74, Strengthen Opioid Misuse Prevention (STOP ACT) H243/S175 was signed on June 29, 2017 to combat the national opioid epidemic that has had a serious impact in North Carolina. The purpose of this law is to reduce or eliminate inappropriate opioid prescriptions. Several provisions apply to Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) prescribers (Nurse Practitioners [NP] and Certified Nurse Midwives [CNM]), who prescribe controlled substances in a targeted manner. The mission of the North Carolina Board of Nursing is to protect the public by regulating the practice of nursing. The requirement for ongoing training in the prescribing of controlled substances and related topics ensures that licensees who prescribe controlled substances, particularly opioids, do so in a manner that is safe, appropriate and consistent with current standards of care. These requirements are set out for the practice of certified nurses in Administrative Code 21 NVC 21 NVC 36 .0807 and 21 NVC 33 .0111. I prescribe medications, including controlled substances (e.g..B. Hormones, psychoactive medications, stimulants), but I do not prescribe opioids. Do I have to meet the requirement? It is not possible for the board of care to maintain an up-to-date and complete list of available courses that meet the controlled substances requirement.

There are many existing online and staff training courses that meet continuing education requirements, which “prescribe controlled substances that prescribe practices, detect signs of abuse or abuse of controlled substances, and prescribe controlled substances for the treatment of chronic pain,” as outlined in North Carolina Administrative Code 21 NVC 36.0807 and 21 NVC 33 .0111. . . .