A Set Of Subject Verb Agreement

Article 3. The verb in either or either, or neither or the sentence is not closest to the name or pronoun. Sometimes names take strange forms and can fool us to think that they are plural if they are truly singular and vice versa. You`ll find more help in the section on plural forms of nouns and in the section on collective nouns. Words such as glasses, pants, pliers and scissors are considered plural (and require plural verbs), unless they are followed by the pair of sentences (in this case, the pair of words becomes subject). 11. Expressions such as .B. with, including, accompanied by, add or not change the number of theme. If the subject is singular, the verb is also. 4.

Remember the indeterminate Pronoun EXCEPTIONS, which is dealt with in section 3.5, p.18: Some, Any, None, All and Most. The number of these subjects is influenced by a prepositionphrase between the subject and the verb. Our second example, “a few inshore fishing boats were,” may seem wrong, because “couple” is unique. But who said that the “couple” was the subject of the verb? “A few boats” is called a no-no phrase. 7. Names such as citizens, mathematics, dollars, measles and news require singular verbs. This composite subject therefore requires a singular verb to accept it. In this example, the jury acts as an entity; Therefore, the verb is singular. The rules of agreement do not apply to assets when they are used as a useful second verb in a couple. A third group of indeterminate pronouns takes either a singular or plural verb, depending on the pronouns that have meaning in the sentence. Look at them carefully. Anyone who uses a plural verb with a collective noun must be careful to be precise – and also coherent.

This should not be done lightly. The following is the kind of incorrect sentence that one sees and hears these days: However, the plural verb is used when the focus is on the individuals in the group. It`s much rarer. In the example above, the plural corresponds to the actors of the subject. Expressions of rupture like half, part of, a percentage of, the majority of are sometimes singular and sometimes plural, depending on the meaning. (The same is true, of course, when all, all, more, most and some act as subjects.) The totals and products of mathematical processes are expressed in singular and require singular verbs. The phrase “more than one” (weirdly) takes on a singular verb: “More than one student has tried to do so.” What if one part of the composite subject is singular and the other part is plural? Article 7. Use a singular verb with distances, periods, sums of money, etc., if they are considered a unit. As a phrase like “Neither my brothers nor my father will sell the house” seems strange, it is probably a good idea to bring the plural subject closer to the verb whenever possible.